STANDARD INSULATED
CEDAR CAT HOUSES
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and EXTENDED ROOF
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DOUBLE DECKERS
and DUPLEXES
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Cedar Wood Outdoor Cat Houses

Cat Door – The Quick Shopper’s Guide

If you’re getting tired of “serving” your cat, of opening the front door every time it wants to go outside, then simply have a cat door installed. Most of these cat flaps – chances are you’ve seen one – are merely plastic flaps; they can be weighed down so they won’t flap to the wind, or be held in place with magnets. Some flaps are made of harder stuff, but just light enough so your cat can push it open; soon, your cat will get used to coming in and going out on its own. Cats who don’t get their way, or are cooped up for too long in-house, may exhibit some troublesome behaviour – furniture used as scratching post, potty accidents, and so on – and having a cat door helps curb these incidents.

Unless you own many pets of varying size – big dogs and cats – you only need a cat door that’s right for your cat’s size. Both animals can use the flap, it’s not a problem. All they have to do is push on the flap to open it. You can set the lock on many flaps to open inwards, or outwards. You have to keep in mind, now, that because your cat can come and go as it wants, so can other animals (or small kids) of roughly the same size. For that, you’re going to need a snappier, most sophisticated cat door.

Electronic or automatic doors are meant to keep away other animals from entering your house – actually the same principle works on small kids and burglars. The same principle is used in automatic dog doors, which makes use of a devices in the cat’s collar and in the door, which “interact.” Only your cat and walk in and out of your house – it should wear a special collar that the electronic doors recognises and opens the flap upon sensing. Some pet owners are annoyed to find racoons, feral cats, and neighbour’s intrusive cats inside their homes – and you want none of that. Your cat is to wear a collar with an infrared, radio, or magnetic device – which serves as the trigger for the electronic door to open.

Now, just because you’ve put in a door just for your cat means the cat immediately understands your intentions; far from it, you might need to train your cat to use the flap. Bring it to the flap after it’s installed and push the flap open to show the way out. If you installed a full-automatic cat door, you must make sure your cat wears the special collar that activates the doors. You cat has to associate its proximity to the door with the door’s opening. You may have to use some enticement, like treats, to let your cat be comfortable seeing and using the cat door.

Posted under Miscellaneous Content

This post was written by Noel D'Costa on October 1, 2010

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